vikingsarebetter:

The problem with being in any fandom is that the longer you’re in it, the more obvious the immature and obnoxious side of the fandom becomes, and, all too often, that can completely ruin something for you.

(Source: smallherosix)

jerkidiot:

have you ever stopped liking somebody that you liked a lot and suddenly notice that they are a shitty person and realize how blinded you were by how much you liked them

If the signs were mythological creatures: Aries: Werewolf
Taurus: Hell hound
Gemini: Doppelgänger
Cancer: Banshee
Leo: Fairy
Virgo: Angel
Libra: Nymph
Scorpio: Siren
Sagittarius: Ghost
Capricorn: Mermaid
Aquarius: Meme
Pisces: Shapeshifter
Favourite anime director: Shinichiro Watanabe

"It actually kind of sucks having to be a director. Once you do it, you discover how hard it really is. This is no kind of a job for a human being, let me tell you. I think I ought to quit, but I can’t really do anything else!"

(Source: corporation-cats)

Game of Thrones Season 4 Bloopers (x)

(Source: rubyredwisp)

304am:


"You’ve been working too hard, take a break!!"

I couldn’t have finished this without Sally THANK YOU!!!!

304am:

"You’ve been working too hard, take a break!!"

I couldn’t have finished this without Sally THANK YOU!!!!

keltastalunta:

satsuki showing those losers how it’s done

keltastalunta:

satsuki showing those losers how it’s done

8bitsaitama:

Yusuke Murata draws Eyeshield 21 art for the 12th anniversary

Happy anniversary Eyeshield 21, you were a great manga that everyone needs to read.

Q: Girls are discouraged? That sounds so 1970s.

A: There was a 2001 study that showed in fourth grade, 68% of boys and 66% of girls like science. Starting in sixth, seventh and eighth grade, we lose girls and boys, but we lose more girls and for different reasons: lingering stereotypes, societal pressures. It’s well known that many girls have a tendency to dumb down when they’re in middle school. Just last week, I was talking to senior executives, and a woman told me that she was the best biology student in high school and had the highest exam scores. At the end of the semester, a teacher told her: “I’m sorry, but I’m going to have to give the award in biology to a boy, because it’s more important to him.” Almost every time that I give a speech or meet with a group of women, I’ll hear such stories.

Q: Boys earn 70% of the D’s and F’s in school and account for 80% of dropouts. Shouldn’t we fear more for their future?

A: It’s a big problem. Women earn the majority of undergraduate degrees in the U.S. and last year earned more Ph.D.s than men. But keeping girls in the science and math pipeline is a separate problem with different causes. It’s important we address both. You don’t stop research on breast cancer just because heart disease is also deadly. You work on both.

Q: Suppose you were an executive of a corporation that needs engineers. You meet a girl in high school. She scored in the 99th percentile in math on her SATs, yet says she wants to major in psychology or go to law school, because those careers sound more interesting. What do you tell her?

A: I’d introduce her to the coolest female engineer in the company. Girls tend to have a stereotype of engineers being 65-year-old guys who wear lab coats and pocket protectors and look like Einstein. Try to make it personal to them and show them some of the cool things that they can do in engineering.

Q: Let’s talk Lawrence Summers. The Harvard president recently resigned after giving a controversial speech a year ago suggesting that men might simply be predisposed to be better at math and science. Is there at least a grain of truth in what he said?

A: (Laughs). Suppose you came across a woman lying on the street with an elephant sitting on her chest. You notice she is short of breath. Shortness of breath can be a symptom of heart problems. In her case, the much more likely cause is the elephant on her chest.

For a long time, society put obstacles in the way of women who wanted to enter the sciences. That is the elephant. Until the playing field has been leveled and lingering stereotypes are gone, you can’t even ask the question.

Q: I will anyway. There are many obvious biological differences between men and women. This can’t be one?

A: There are obvious differences, but until you eliminate the more obvious cause, it’s difficult to get at the question scientifically. Look at law, medicine and business. In 1970 — that’s not ancient history — law school was 5% female, med school was 8% and business school was 4%. You could have taken a look at those numbers and concluded that women don’t make good lawyers or doctors. The statistics might have supported you. But today, all of those fields are about 50-50.

—Sally Ride (the first American woman in space) giving awesome answers to insipid questions in this interview.  (via itsawomansworld2)